The second hand is on the rise: here are our good addresses in Rodez

In the apparel sector, the second hand is on the rise. In Rodez, there are several addresses downtown.

Toilet – Red Cross

The French Red Cross has seven vestibules in Aveyron, in Interage, Millau, More de Paris, Rodez, Saint-Afrique, Severac-le-Chateau and Villefranche de Roergue. “Their first goal is to allow people with limited means to wear clothes,” recalls Jacques Tourette, head of the department at the association.

The clothes come from private donations and are resold for modest amounts ranging from €0.50 to €2. He asserts that “the second goal is to make these places places of meeting and socializing. People can be received in an office with complete confidentiality to be listened to, accompanied and directed towards the network of social actors.”

The third objective, related to the previous one, is to provide immediate assistance when needed. Jacques Tourette says: “One family tells us that they have nothing left to eat, we don’t ask ourselves questions and fill their fridge during the day. This affects more than we think. There is a phenomenon of impoverishment and hidden misery in our rural sections. As times are tough, more and more are coming. of people to have some fun with us.” Clothing stores are open to all without discrimination.

3 de Sonak Street

Red Cross.
Press Center – Jose A. Torres

Emmaus

The Emmaus Friends Committee was established in the eighties, and began selling furniture and ornaments. Then the Emmaüs Aveyron community was established in the early 1990s with the reception of his comrades. At this time the room for used clothes was opened. “The second hand is far from a new phenomenon for Emmaüs, which was a precursor to the circular economy,” says Véronique Magnaux, director of the Rodez and Villefranche-de-Rouergue sites. “We receive a 13-ton container each month and we keep about 3.5 tons for our warehouses: clothing: For men, women and children, home furnishings, shoes, leather goods … “

For the rest, natural materials such as cotton and wool are used to make sandwich panels in northern France, while other materials enter the recycling cycle by selling them in bales to integration companies. “With us, clothes are three times cheaper than in stores. The price of a shirt is 2 euros, and trousers 4 or 5 euros … the average basket is about fifteen euros.”

8 rue des Artisans, Z.A. Bel Air and 41, rue de l’Embergue

Emmaus.

Emmaus.
Press Center – Jose A. Torres

It’s Rococo

says Malika Farines, who has dreamed of opening her own thrift store since discovering this type of store in the 20’s in Toulouse. “It was carefully thought out and it took eighteen years to realize my dream,” explains the person who started Rue Saint-Just in September 2021 and moved into a 75-square-meter room on Rue de Bale last March.

C’est Rococo offers vintage clothing and accessories, that is, over twenty years old. Malika Farines has long been stocked up at garage sales and flea markets, but in the face of increasing difficulty finding beautiful pieces, she has turned to specialist suppliers with whom she spends a day or two “picking out”, in other words, choosing the piece of clothing by piece. “It’s a long time, you have to check every element to see if there are any missing holes, spots or buttons.”

Her clients, ranging in age from 15 to 95, come from diverse backgrounds and she is happy to have more and more men and “trans”men who, they admitted, wouldn’t have bought second-hand things at the age of five.

10 Rue du Pal

It's Rococo.

It’s Rococo.
Press Center – Jose A. Torres

Collimated

On June 30, consignment store Parallèle will celebrate its 30th birthday. To take advantage of this long life, there’s no secret, “you need rigor and good quality goods,” says Solange Sollier. If there were other missions on the ship, it’s the rest today.

Offers a service to individuals: reselling their clothes for a commission. “Pas de photo à faire, ni d’annonce à rédiger ou de colis à déposer, je m’occupe de tout, lance-t-elle. Les gens viennent déposer des vêtements qui ne leur vont plus, dont ils se sont oulassés.” qu’ils ont acheté et laissent au placard. J’estime le prix qui sera payé au dépositaire et quand c’est vendu, il vient chercher son dû”, explique la commerçante qui prend des marques, très prop peu portées, en condition.

There are clothes in sizes 36 to 44, but there are also various shoes, bags, and accessories. “The advantage of my store compared to all these second-hand clothing sites is that you can look at the cut and finishes, feel the materials, and try. On the Internet, the pictures are sometimes misleading, so customers send items back and that’s a lot of transportation that’s hurting the planet.”

8 rue de l’Abbé Bessou

Parallel thrift store.

Parallel thrift store.
Press Center – Jose A. Torres

beautiful fripes

Passionate about china, flea markets, and second-hand clothing since the age of 17, Marion Dunnett launched an online used clothing website in November 2019. In 2020, she joined other young entrepreneurs at Da Store. , rue de Bonald, and then opened her own store on Rue La Madeleine in January 2021. “I show clothes and accessories there (shoes, bags, belts, scarves, etc.)” A vintage occasion from the 1960s to the 1990s. Colorful pieces and original looks for a unique style”, sums up the 25-year-old.

Order in kilograms from wholesalers who specialize in used clothing, sorts, washes, removes and repairs when necessary, irons, racks and labels. “It’s long, boring and time-consuming; I can work 50-70 hours a week,” confirms Marion Dunnett who also sells some new creations in recycled materials and showcases local artists. “It’s been a journey. Today, I don’t have a huge salary or job security, but I’m doing a passionate job that makes sense for me and the planet.”

6 rue de la Madeleine

Beautiful potatoes.

Beautiful potatoes.
Press Center – Jose A. Torres

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